Meditation for All Souls Weekend

I am almost two weeks late in publishing this post. When the replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg was announced, I had so many things I wanted to say, so many things that seemed important. But I was blocked from typing them. It wasn’t a typical writer’s block, or lack of desire to write. It wasn’t being busy. It was that whenever I sat down to type what I was thinking I couldn’t do it. It was the kind of blockage that I had to admit that what I wanted to say wasn’t what I should say. I had to regroup. And so I did. I continued reading The Magical Battle of Britain. I continued to meditate and try to connect with the inner planes. And I found my answers in time to post before All Hallows Eve and All Souls Day. The timing is important.

We are counseled that when we do this work we should attempt to not be partisan. “Our work is a work of healing and no hate must come of it.” The more I look at the partisan divisions and anger in our country, I can see how we will not be able to address our group consciousness unless we can first heal the group. As I look at the state of things in this country today, I try to consider how to not be partisan. And then I found words in my reading: “It is not well to pass by on the other side when thieves are beating honest men.” I realized that it is not partisan to be angry at bad behavior. The evil actions we are seeing from our current administration are not themselves party actions, they are the actions of immoral people who happen to have concentrated themselves in a party and to have convinced those not in power that their actions are in fact acceptable. Then I realized that these people have been operating to influence the national group soul and the group mind for several decades. It is that influence that needs to be counteracted, not the true policies of a political party. As a final nudge as to the direction to take, I came across these words: “To achieve this peace there must be strength and integrity in the souls of the nations; there must be willingness to sacrifice individual national interests for the good of the whole, the strong remembering that they are in a better position to make sacrifices than the weak; but there must also be a readiness to unsheath and use the sword of justice when it is needed.”

Thus it becomes the duty to define the good of the whole and try to act on our national group mind thoughts that will lead us in that direction. What is the good of the whole? As said before, equality, liberty, and the rule of law. What does equality mean? Certainly it means that if something is necessary for life, all in the society should have access to it. This would mean food, shelter, education, health care. It should also mean that all should have an equal voice in the governance of the society. In other words, equal access to the polls. What does liberty mean? It means the freedom to, in the words of Paul the Apostle, “work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.” In other words, use your own conscience to determine what you believe and how you express that belief. It means the freedom to move about the country and the world as you are able and choose (and within your financial ability). It means the freedom to live where you choose, marry who you choose, think as you choose. And what is meant by rule of law? It means that the law will be applied with an even hand regardless of race, religion, ethnic origin, gender, sexual identification, orientation, or preference, economic status and so on. The equal application of law begins with law enforcement in the streets and ends in the courtroom. These are things that our nation as a whole has not been doing in spite of all our fancy words and boastings to the contrary.

This brings me to the meditation for the next few days. I see in meditation the rotunda in the Capital. I visualize a large round table in the middle of the rotunda. At this table are seated the truly great souls that are part of our fabric. I even see some great souls who were did not live on this soil but whose lives exert influence on those who do live here. I listen quietly and let them talk.

On All Souls Eve, I particularly look to those great souls who passed in the last year (I will extend that a month to include Elijah Cummings) and the work they put forward in promoting the good of the whole. I look to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and her efforts on behalf of women’s equality, the rights of the less powerful, the rights of those who are not white males. I look to Congressmen John Lewis and Elijah Cummings and their long battles for civil rights not only for Black Americans, but Americans of all colors and ethnic backgrounds, as well as women and LGBTQ. I look to their understanding that when any group’s rights are curtailed all of our rights are at risk. On All Souls Eve, I think of their work and listen for words of encouragement and advice.

On All Souls Day, I am also listening to great souls from earlier days. I listen for Dr. Martin Luther King, for Dorothy Day, Cesar  Chavez, Senator Daniel Inouye, Harriet Tubman, Frances Perkins, Susan B Anthony, President Abraham Lincoln. Possibly I listen for President John Adams, his wife Abigail, and his cousin Samuel. I try to attune my energy to theirs.

At the end of each meditation, I ask them to guide our people. I ask them to speak to our group consciousness about what is truly meant by democracy and what our people must stand for. I ask them to whisper to our group soul the value of taking care of one another as well as taking care of ourselves. I also ask them to counsel me in patience and understanding, that the condition of our nation is the result of many decades of national hypocrisy, of sweeping our prejudices under the rug, and that this will not be cured in one election, nor will it be cured easily. Once again, I remind myself of the counsel of Dion Fortune: “Never attempt to deal with specific problems or to direct the course of affairs on the physical plane. Bring through spiritual force and leave it to that force to work its own way.”